Shakespeare Authorship Sourcebook

“The strange, difficult, contradictory man who emerges as the real Shakespeare, Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford, is not just plausible but fascinating and wholly believable.”
By David McCullough, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian, in his introduction to Charlton Ogburn’s The Mysterious William Shakespeare.

For a superb introduction to the Shakespeare Authorship controversy, go to The Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship.

Our Purpose

This Sourcebook aims to provide direct and comprehensive access to evidence and arguments related to the Shakespeare authorship controversy as it applies to Shakspere of Stratford and Edward De Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford. As much as possible, this site will provide uncluttered access to original texts and documents. Oxfordians believe that open minds free to access original sources and factual evidence will be persuaded.

For my background on this issue, you may want to read Why I Became an Oxfordian.

Chronologies:

Shakspere Chronology

Oxford Chronology

Oxfordian Essays:

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In the Oxfordian Library:

The Writings of Charles Wisner Barrell

The Writings of Gwynneth Bowen

The Writings of Lilian Winstanley

Other Interesting Links:

Shakespeare Law Library

Elizabethan E-texts

Kindle books by Sir George Greenwood

Kindle book by Lilian Winstanley’s, Hamlet and the Scottish Succession.

Hear Michael York read the Declaration of Reasonable Doubt as you read along.

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Note: For the sake of clarity, these are the naming conventions used in the Commentary throughout this site:

“Shakspere” is used when referring to the man of Stratford-upon-Avon who is generally regarded as the author of the Shakespeare poems and plays. This form appears on both his baptism record and his will.

“Shakespeare” is used to refer to the author of the Shakespeare poems and plays without reference to either candidate. This form is most frequently found on the quartos and folios of the poems and plays.

“The Actor” is used on occasion to refer to the “Shakespeare” noted in some documents as a player or as associated with known players. This distinction may prove to be useful since there seems to some contention about exactly who is “Shakespeare” the actor.

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Mark Alexander, P. O. Box 5286, Auburn, CA 95604.